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The Food Timeline

15 Aug
bread 1

bread 1 (Photo credit: awrose)

The Food Timeline (click here to visit link)

Ever wonder how the ancient Romans fed their armies? What the pioneers cooked along the Oregon Trail? Who invented the potato chip…and why? So do we!!! Food history presents a fascinating buffet of popular lore and contradictory facts. Some experts say it’s impossible to express this topic in exact timeline format. They are correct. Most foods are not invented; they evolve.

The Food Timeline was created by Lynne Olver, reference librarian with a passion for food history. Information is checked against standard reference tools for accuracy. All sources are cited for research purposes. As with most historical topics, there are some conflicting stories in the field of food history. We do our best to select and present the information with the most documented support.

Since we launched in March 1999, The Food Timeline’s scope has grown from a single page with a sprinkling of links to 50+ web pages offering a wealth of historic information, primary documents, and original research. As of June 23, 2012 we served 29 million readers and answered 23.7 thousand questions. Compare today’s site with the original Food Timeline, circa 1999. Our notes on the art of culinary research with a side order ofpopular requests. The Food Timeline is recognized by the American Library Association as a Great Website for Kids and was reviewed in ALA’sacademic publication Choice, July 2009.

The recipes featured on our site are selected from a variety of sources including old cook books, newspapers, magazines, National Historic Parks, government agencies, universities, cultural organizations, culinary historians, and company/restaurant web sites. We have not cooked them in our own kitchens and cannot vouch for their results in yours. If you have any questions regarding the ingredients, instructions or safety of these recipes please forward them directly to the webmaster of the site hosting that recipe. Recipes from primary documents are linked for historical purposes only. If you plan to cook one of these, they need to be examined very carefully for unsafe practices (such as the eating of raw eggs).”

ancient noodles

ancient noodles (Photo credit: blackcealt)

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One Response to “The Food Timeline”

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  1. Food History: Before there were Restaurants, there were Street Kitchens | The Rambling Epicure - October 5, 2012

    […] The Food Timeline […]

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