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HARVARD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY OPEN COLLECTIONS PROGRAM “Women Working, 1800-1930

22 Sep

HARVARD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY OPEN COLLECTIONS PROGRAM “Women Working, 1800-1930

It has been just about thirty years that the contemporary field of women's history has been in practice. There have been changes within the field, in the bulk of the work and where its gravity lands. The initial impulses and ambitions in the field simply were to make women visible, to put women on the historical record, to enable women's voices to be heard, to listen to their voices, and to show their points of view. That was not a simple endeavor. It involved changing--broadening--what had been seen as "history," what had been seen as historically important. It even involved changing typical periodization and assumptions about causation in history. The ambition to focus on women's lives and experiences involved revisualizing what was subject to history...Fulfilling that ambition significantly changed what was in the corpus of US history in the 1970s and into the 1980s.--Nancy Cott, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Senior Fellow of the Society of Fellows, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library--Harvard UniversityThis site is offers textual and visual historical resources for teaching, learning, and researching the history of women working in the United States. It currently includes almost 3,500 digitized books, 7,500 manuscript pages, and 1,200 photographs. Holdings include letters, diaries, scrapbooks, magazines, catalogs, photographs, books, and pamphlets (both non-fiction and fiction). Visitors may browse through the “New Additions” area, look through materials by topic (such as home labor, arts, or business), search catalog keywords, or perform a full text search.

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