Video

HISTORY OF VETERAN’S DAY (or Remembrance Day in some countries)

11 Nov

“On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in the First World War, then known as “the Great War.” Commemorated as Armistice Day beginning the following year, November 11th became a legal federal holiday in the United States in 1938. In the aftermath of World War II and the Korean War, Armistice Day became Veterans Day, a holiday dedicated to American veterans of all wars.”

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IRAN Documentary Yesterday and Today : Rick Steves

10 Nov

IRAN Documentary Yesterday and Today : Rick Steves.

Link

Qin Shi Huang Di

10 Nov

Qin Shi Huang Di

 “…Qin Shi Huang Di made life a little easier for the rest of China.  He standardized all the measurments, roads, writing and other stuff so that it wouldn’t be so fucking confusing to travel around the country there.  He built some wooden walls which would become the basis for the Great Wall of China, one of the greatest and most balls-out construction projects in human history.  Sure, he was oppressive, tyrannical and brutal, but he was also pretty damn efficient and he laid the groundwork for a Chinese national identity that has lasted upwards of two thousand years.

He was also totally paranoid.  Early in his reign, some jerk assassin named Jing Ke tried to stab Qin Shi Huang with a fan and even though Qin managed to whip out his sword and kill the shit out of Jing, he was pretty much untrusting of anyone from that point on.  His paranoia led him to relocate the leaders of each of the states he conquered to live in the capital of Qin so that he and his men could keep an eye on them.  He had royal food tasters try everything before he ate it.  He rarely came out in public.  He burned scholarly works that disagreed with his philosophy of Legalism and buried Confucian scholars alive so that they wouldn’t fuck with him.  While there’s really nothing cool about burning books and executing scholars, you sort of have to respect the fact that Qin Shi Huang was willing to go that extra mile to ensure the longevity of his reign.”

Qin Shi Huang Di

Qin Dynasty
Link

America’s Revolution Was Fought By The Poor, Not The Citizens

10 Nov

America’s Revolution Was Fought By The Poor, Not The Citizens

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The impoverished, the disenfranchised, and the “filth” (Washington’s words not ours), fought for and won all the lofty freedoms conceived of in town halls, alehouses, and eventually Philadelphia. That didn’t just happen at random, either. That’s exactly how America’s wealthier colonists planned it.

When the war became reality, there was a remarkable dearth of ardent patriots willing to stop a musket ball for “liberty.” Overwhelmingly, colonists of any means whatsoever paid drifters and vagabonds to take their place in the fight against the British.  Or, if they had them available, a wealthy colonist might order a slave or servant to join the army. Is there anything nobler than risking the life of another for your ideals? Apparently not, since it wasn’t just the powdered wig wearers who bought the military service of the poor. Middle and lower-class colonists alike often pooled their monies together to hire a “down and outer” for three years’ service. When all else failed, colonies (especially the southern ones) released convicts and enrolled them in the army.”

http://i0.wp.com/knowledgenuts.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/rev.jpg?resize=1024%2C537

Video

FAMOUS PEOPLE WHO MARRIED THEIR COUSINS

10 Nov

“A weekly show hosted by John Green, where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John looks at some rather famous people who married their cousins including Albert Einstein, Charles Darwin and Queen Victoria.”

Video

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY SESAME STREET!!!

10 Nov

“The preschool educational television program Sesame Street was first aired on public broadcasting television stations November 10, 1969, and reached its 44th season in 2013. The history of Sesame Street has reflected changing attitudes to developmental psychology, early childhood education and cultural diversity. Featuring Jim Henson’s Muppets, animation, live shorts, humor and celebrity appearances, it was the first television program of its kind to base its content and production values on laboratory and formative research, and the first to include a curriculum “detailed or stated in terms of measurable outcomes”.[1] Initial responses to the show included adulatory reviews, some controversy and high ratings. By its 40th anniversary in 2009, Sesame Street was broadcast in over 120 countries, and 20 independent international versions had been produced”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Sesame_Street

November 10 1969 Sesame Street debuts

10 Nov

Use to be my favorite show.

Craig Hill Training Services

On November 10th 1969, “Sesame Street,” a pioneering TV show that would teach generations of young children the alphabet and how to count, made its broadcast debut.

“Sesame Street,” with its memorable theme song (“Can you tell me how to get/How to get to Sesame Street”), went on to become the most widely viewed children’s program in the world.

It has aired in more than 120 countries.

The show was the brainchild of Joan Ganz Cooney, a former documentary producer for public television.

Cooney’s goal was to create programming for preschoolers that was both entertaining and educational.

She also wanted to use TV as a way to help underprivileged 3- to 5- year-olds prepare for kindergarten.

“Sesame Street” was set in a fictional New York neighbourhood and included ethnically diverse characters and positive social messages.

Taking a cue from “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In,” a popular 1960s variety…

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