Tag Archives: Europe
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10 Amazing Women Who Led Rebellions

11 Nov

10 Amazing Women Who Led Rebellions

 “Male revolutionaries such as Che Guevara have gone down as heroes for leading rebellions against “the Man.” But forgotten by history are the women who took on far greater powers than Fulgencio Batista. Throughout the ages, women have led rebellions and revolutions which took on the might of the Roman Empire and the vast wealth of the British East India Company.”

Emila_Plater_conducting_Polish_scythemen_in_1831

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HISTORY OF VETERAN’S DAY (or Remembrance Day in some countries)

11 Nov

“On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in the First World War, then known as “the Great War.” Commemorated as Armistice Day beginning the following year, November 11th became a legal federal holiday in the United States in 1938. In the aftermath of World War II and the Korean War, Armistice Day became Veterans Day, a holiday dedicated to American veterans of all wars.”

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The Association of Religion Data Archives.

8 Nov

The Association of Religion Data Archives.

The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) strives to democratize access to the best data on religion. Founded as the American Religion Data Archive in 1997 and going online in 1998, the initial archive was targeted at researchers interested in American religion. The targeted audience and the data collection have both greatly expanded since 1998, now including American and international collections and developing features for educators, journalists, religious congregations, and researchers. Data included in the ARDA are submitted by the foremost religion scholars and research centers in the world. Currently housed in the Social Science Research Institute, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University, the ARDA is funded by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, Chapman University and the Pennsylvania State University.”

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Can’t Buy Me Love: How Romance Wrecked Traditional Marriage

3 Nov

Can’t Buy Me Love: How Romance Wrecked Traditional Marriage

 “Love was considered a reason not to get married. It was seen as lust, as something that would dissipate.”

For most of recorded human history, marriage was an arrangement designed to maximize financial stability. Elizabeth Abbott, the author of “A History of Marriage” explains that in ancient times, marriage was intended to unite various parts of a community, cementing beneficial economic relationships. “Because it was a financial arrangement, it was conceived of and operated as such. It was a contract between families. For example, let’s say I’m a printer and you make paper, we might want a marriage between our children because that will improve our businesses.” Even the honeymoon, often called the “bridal tour,” was a communal affair, with parents, siblings, and other close relatives traveling together to reinforce their new familial relationships.”

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WORLD HISTORY MATTERS

23 Oct

WORLD HISTORY MATTERS

 

World History Matters History websites developed by the Center for History and New Media”

 

“This portal to world history on the web offers direct access to two projects—World History Sources and Women in World History—that provide resources to help world history teachers and students locate, analyze, and learn from primary sources and further their understanding of the complex nature of world history, especially issues of cultural contact and globalization. Use the search engine from the portal to search both sites at the same time or visit and each site separately.”

 

 Screenshot of World History Matters

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Vlad the Impaler ; The Real Dracula

12 Oct

“Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia (1431–1476), was a member of the House of Drăculești, a branch of the House of Basarab, also known by his patronymic name: Dracula. He was posthumously dubbed Vlad the Impaler (Romanian: Vlad Țepeș pronounced [ˈvlad ˈt͡sepeʃ]), and was a three-time Voivode of Wallachia, ruling mainly from 1456 to 1462, the period of the incipient Ottoman conquest of the Balkans. His father, Vlad II Dracul, was a member of the Order of the Dragon, which was founded to protect Christianity in Eastern Europe. Vlad III is revered as a hero in Bulgaria as well for his protection of the Bulgarian population both south and north of the Danube. A significant number of Bulgarian common folk and remaining boyars (nobles) moved north of the Danube, recognized his leadership and became part of Wallachia, following his raids on the Ottomans.”

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8 Natural Disasters of Ancient Times

12 Oct

8 Natural Disasters of Ancient Times

From Listverse”Natural disasters are something that humanity has had to deal with since its inception. They have the capability to wipe out significant amounts of the human and wildlife populations where they strike. In fact, it is possible that a natural disaster will be the cause of the end of the world, whenever that inevitably happens. They could be avoided, to some extent, by removing the human population from areas where natural disasters are known to strike. However, looking back on natural disasters in the past, we see that people were just as prone to exposing themselves to the risk of natural disasters as they are today.”Picture-1-63

 

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