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10 Amazing Women Who Led Rebellions

11 Nov

10 Amazing Women Who Led Rebellions

 “Male revolutionaries such as Che Guevara have gone down as heroes for leading rebellions against “the Man.” But forgotten by history are the women who took on far greater powers than Fulgencio Batista. Throughout the ages, women have led rebellions and revolutions which took on the might of the Roman Empire and the vast wealth of the British East India Company.”

Emila_Plater_conducting_Polish_scythemen_in_1831

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Qin Shi Huang Di

10 Nov

Qin Shi Huang Di

 “…Qin Shi Huang Di made life a little easier for the rest of China.  He standardized all the measurments, roads, writing and other stuff so that it wouldn’t be so fucking confusing to travel around the country there.  He built some wooden walls which would become the basis for the Great Wall of China, one of the greatest and most balls-out construction projects in human history.  Sure, he was oppressive, tyrannical and brutal, but he was also pretty damn efficient and he laid the groundwork for a Chinese national identity that has lasted upwards of two thousand years.

He was also totally paranoid.  Early in his reign, some jerk assassin named Jing Ke tried to stab Qin Shi Huang with a fan and even though Qin managed to whip out his sword and kill the shit out of Jing, he was pretty much untrusting of anyone from that point on.  His paranoia led him to relocate the leaders of each of the states he conquered to live in the capital of Qin so that he and his men could keep an eye on them.  He had royal food tasters try everything before he ate it.  He rarely came out in public.  He burned scholarly works that disagreed with his philosophy of Legalism and buried Confucian scholars alive so that they wouldn’t fuck with him.  While there’s really nothing cool about burning books and executing scholars, you sort of have to respect the fact that Qin Shi Huang was willing to go that extra mile to ensure the longevity of his reign.”

Qin Shi Huang Di

Qin Dynasty
Link

America’s Revolution Was Fought By The Poor, Not The Citizens

10 Nov

America’s Revolution Was Fought By The Poor, Not The Citizens

 “

 

The impoverished, the disenfranchised, and the “filth” (Washington’s words not ours), fought for and won all the lofty freedoms conceived of in town halls, alehouses, and eventually Philadelphia. That didn’t just happen at random, either. That’s exactly how America’s wealthier colonists planned it.

When the war became reality, there was a remarkable dearth of ardent patriots willing to stop a musket ball for “liberty.” Overwhelmingly, colonists of any means whatsoever paid drifters and vagabonds to take their place in the fight against the British.  Or, if they had them available, a wealthy colonist might order a slave or servant to join the army. Is there anything nobler than risking the life of another for your ideals? Apparently not, since it wasn’t just the powdered wig wearers who bought the military service of the poor. Middle and lower-class colonists alike often pooled their monies together to hire a “down and outer” for three years’ service. When all else failed, colonies (especially the southern ones) released convicts and enrolled them in the army.”

http://i0.wp.com/knowledgenuts.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/rev.jpg?resize=1024%2C537

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The Association of Religion Data Archives.

8 Nov

The Association of Religion Data Archives.

The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) strives to democratize access to the best data on religion. Founded as the American Religion Data Archive in 1997 and going online in 1998, the initial archive was targeted at researchers interested in American religion. The targeted audience and the data collection have both greatly expanded since 1998, now including American and international collections and developing features for educators, journalists, religious congregations, and researchers. Data included in the ARDA are submitted by the foremost religion scholars and research centers in the world. Currently housed in the Social Science Research Institute, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University, the ARDA is funded by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, Chapman University and the Pennsylvania State University.”

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Ancient Kingdom Discovered Beneath Mound in Iraq Oct 1, 2013 10:00 AM ET // by Owen Jarus, LiveScience

8 Nov

Ancient Kingdom Discovered Beneath Mound in Iraq Oct 1, 2013 10:00 AM ET // by Owen Jarus, LiveScience

 “

In the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq archaeologists have discovered an ancient city called Idu, hidden beneath a mound.

Cuneiform inscriptions and works of art reveal the palaces that flourished in the city throughout its history thousands of years ago.

Located in a valley on the northern bank of the lower Zab River, the city’s remains are now part of a mound created by human occupation called a tell, which rises about 32 feet (10 meters) above the surrounding plain. The earliest remains date back to Neolithic times, when farming first appeared in the Middle East, and a modern-day village called Satu Qala now lies on top of the tell.”

Link

Can’t Buy Me Love: How Romance Wrecked Traditional Marriage

3 Nov

Can’t Buy Me Love: How Romance Wrecked Traditional Marriage

 “Love was considered a reason not to get married. It was seen as lust, as something that would dissipate.”

For most of recorded human history, marriage was an arrangement designed to maximize financial stability. Elizabeth Abbott, the author of “A History of Marriage” explains that in ancient times, marriage was intended to unite various parts of a community, cementing beneficial economic relationships. “Because it was a financial arrangement, it was conceived of and operated as such. It was a contract between families. For example, let’s say I’m a printer and you make paper, we might want a marriage between our children because that will improve our businesses.” Even the honeymoon, often called the “bridal tour,” was a communal affair, with parents, siblings, and other close relatives traveling together to reinforce their new familial relationships.”

Link

WORLD HISTORY MATTERS

23 Oct

WORLD HISTORY MATTERS

 

World History Matters History websites developed by the Center for History and New Media”

 

“This portal to world history on the web offers direct access to two projects—World History Sources and Women in World History—that provide resources to help world history teachers and students locate, analyze, and learn from primary sources and further their understanding of the complex nature of world history, especially issues of cultural contact and globalization. Use the search engine from the portal to search both sites at the same time or visit and each site separately.”

 

 Screenshot of World History Matters

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